Video: Earth Day, 2022

Over 50 years ago, on April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans took to the streets to protest environmental destruction and to celebrate the wonders of Planet Earth. The basic message was that we had to find new ways to live our lives, raise our food, and conduct our businesses that were environmentally friendly and sustainable—that would not waste resources or pollute the air, the water, or the soil.

In the early 1970s, Bio Huma Netics and Mesa Verde Humates were independently formed to provide earth-friendly agricultural products and soil and wastewater bioremediation products.

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What Differentiates Humic and Fulvic Acids?

By Richard Lamar, PhD
Director of Humic Research
Bio Huma Netics, Inc.

For centuries, humic acids (HA) were thought to be composed of much larger molecules than those found in fulvic acids (FA). However, the application of Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), which separates molecules on the basis of molecular weight, demonstrates that the molecular weights of the two fractions both fall in the range of 200–800 Daltons (Da), with most of the molecules having molecular weights in the range of 200–400 Da (Figure 1). To give context, carbon (C) weighs 12 Da, oxygen (O) weighs 16 Da, and hydrogen (H) weighs 1 Da. Thus, phenol molecules (an aromatic organic compound, also called carbolic acid), which have 6 C, 1 O, and 11 H atoms, weigh 99 Da. [Read more…]

JoVE Video Journal Publication: Quantification of Humic and Fulvic Acids

Dr. Richard T. Lamar and Dr. Hiarhi Monda of our Humic Research Laboratory, with assistance from analytical chemist Ryan Fountain, have published a methodology video in the biochemistry section of the peer-reviewed online video journal, JoVE.

The video, Quantification of Humic and Fulvic Acids in Humate Ores, DOC, Humified Materials and Humic Substance-Containing Commercial Products, shows the step-by-step laboratory methodology (the New Standard Method) for gravimetric quantification of humic substances (e.g., humic and fulvic acids) on an ash-free basis, in dry and liquid materials from soft coals (i.e., oxidized and non-oxidized lignite and sub-bituminous coal), humate ores and shales, peats, composts and commercial fertilizers and soil amendments.

In the video introduction, Dr. Lamar states, “The New Standard Method for quantification of humic acids provides a more accurate and precise analysis compared to the existing regulatorily accepted methods, and it also provides a standard method for pure hydrophobic fulvic acid quantification. The advantage of this protocol is that it provides a gravimetric analysis of humic and hydrophobic fulvic acid concentrations on an ash-free basis, and the extraction process has been optimized to obtain the highest recoveries of both humic and fulvic acids from samples.

At the video’s conclusion, Dr. Monda states, “Following this procedure, the dry humic and fulvic acids obtained can be used for characterization purposes, such as the carbon-13 and the proton NMR electron resonance, and the ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry, among other useful techniques. This can be used for characterization of the humus chemistry, as well as being a useful tool to dig deep into the structure-activity relationship with plant fitness and the underlying plant defense mechanisms.

Direct link to video on the JoVE Website: https://www.jove.com/v/61233/quantification-humic-fulvic-acids-humate-ores-doc-humified-materials (A free subscription will be required to view the entire video on the JoVE Website.)

From the JoVE Website: Filmed at the world’s top scientific institutions, JoVE videos bring to life the intricate details of cutting-edge experiments enabling efficient learning and replication of new research methods and technologies. JoVE is a peer-reviewed scientific video journal that is indexed in PubMed and Web of Science.

Effects of Humic Substances on Soil Microbes

By Richard Lamar, PhD
Senior Director of Humic Research
Bio Huma Netics, Inc.

Most of the work on agricultural applications of humic substances (HS) has focused on their biostimulant effects on plants. Far less work has been conducted on the effects of HS on soil microbial populations. It’s not surprising to learn, from the few studies that have been published, that HS also stimulate the growth of soil bacteria, even the bacteria that inhabit earthworm digestive tracts. One of the most important discoveries is that many species of soil bacteria are able to grow on humic acid (HA) as their sole carbon source (Tikhonov et al., 2010).

These findings have important implications for the roles played by soil bacterial communities—including those residing in the guts of soil fauna, such as earthworms—in the humification process (i.e., the process of conversion of dead plant tissues to humic substances). This means that these bacteria are consuming HS and modifying HS by metabolizing humic molecules and using the metabolized molecules to produce proteins, fats, and other types of molecules. When the bacteria die, they are in turn consumed by other microbes and those molecules created from metabolized humic molecules wind up being included as HS.

The other important piece of information that has come out of the work on bacterial-HS interactions is that, in addition to being potential carbon sources, HS can also act as soil bacterial growth stimulants or growth regulators (Tiknonov et al., 2010). This was demonstrated in a study in which a number of soil isolated bacterial species were grown on a medium that contained glucose as the carbon source (10 mg/ml) and humic acid (1 mg/ml). Thus, the humic acid was 10X lower than the glucose. Growth of the bacteria on this medium was compared with the growth of bacteria on a medium that did not contain the humic acid. The growth of 41% percent of the bacterial species (these were isolated from earthworm digestive tracts) were stimulated by the inclusion of the humic acid. The authors of the study concluded that, because the concentration of glucose was so high and the increase in available carbon from the addition of 1 mg/ml humic acid was insignificant, the humic acid acted as a growth stimulant to the 41% of bacteria whose growth was increased.

These types of studies have demonstrated that HS can stimulate the growth of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (aka PGPR bacteria, for which the “rhizo” stands for rhizosphere or the area of soil that is intimately associated with plant roots). One of the most well-known PGPR bacteria are Pseudomonads, strains of which have been found to be able to solubilize phosphate, produce siderophores (important for Fe uptake), ammonia, and the plant-growth-regulator auxin (Gupta, 2008; Selvakumar et al., 2009).

REFERENCES

Gupta, A. and M. Gopal. 2008. Siderophore production by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Indian J. Agric. Res. 42(2):153–156.

Salvakumar, G., P. Joshi, S. Nazim, P. K. Mishra, J. K. Bisht and H. S. Gupta. 2009. Phosphate solubilization and growth promotion by Pseudomonas fragi CS11RH1 (MTCC8984), a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from a high-altitude Himalayan rhizosphere. Biologia, 64(2)239-245

Tikhonov, V. V., A. V. Yakushev, Y. A. Zavgorodnyaya, B. A. Byzov, and V. V. Demin. 2010. Effect of humic acids on the growth of bacteria.  European Soil Science, 43 (3):305–313.

The Huma Gro Turf Product Quality Assurance Process

In this video, we show the scientific steps we take to make sure that all our Huma Gro® Turf liquid products are built according to specifications, are consistent from batch to batch, and are of the highest quality.

Video: Earth Day, 2021

Over 50 years ago, on April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans took to the streets to protest environmental destruction and to celebrate the wonders of Planet Earth. The basic message was that we had to find new ways to live our lives, raise our food, and conduct our businesses that were environmentally friendly and sustainable—that would not waste resources or pollute the air, the water, or the soil. [Read more…]

Interview with The Fertilizer Institute’s CEO, Corey Rosenbusch

In this (socially distanced) wide-ranging video interview at BHN headquarters, BHN President & CEO Lyndon Smith and The Fertilizer Institute’s (TFI’s) President & CEO Corey Rosenbusch discuss TFI’s mission and vision, TFI member benefits, and challenges facing the fertilizer industry. Topics include TFI legislative and regulatory activities, the 4R Nutrient Stewardship initiative, the Responsible Ag program, new activities with the Biostimulant Coalition, the TFI Sustainability Committee, the TFI State of the Fertilizer Industry Report, and upcoming TFI conferences.

More about TFI can be found at www.tfi.org. The TFI 2019 State of the Fertilizer Industry Report can be found at https://www.fertilizerreport.org/. The online home of 4R Nutrient Stewardship is https://nutrientstewardship.org/4rs/.

Video: BHN Company Values

In this 4-minute video, BHN President/CEO Lyndon Smith speaks with us about BHN’s Company Values—Integrity, Win-Win-Win, Proactive Innovation, Relentless Pursuit of Excellence—and their impact on how we conduct business, treat our customers, and benefit the world.

EARTH DAY 2020: Celebrating 50 Years

Fifty years ago today, on April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans took to the streets to protest environmental destruction and to celebrate the wonders of Planet Earth. The basic message was that we had to find new ways to live our lives, raise our food, and conduct our businesses that were environmentally friendly and sustainable—that would not waste resources or pollute the air, the water, or the soil. [Read more…]

Open, With Care: A Video Message From Bio Huma Netics

BHN Operation Team Message from BHN_Vimeo on Vimeo.

At Bio Huma Netics, Inc., our Operations Team realizes the incredible challenges that are in the world today, and we are doing everything in our power to better serve you.

From the start of the crises, our Team has focused on keeping our employees, customers, families, and communities safe while putting into place safe practices to ensure that we can provide for you, our customers, the products you need in a timely manner.

Despite the stay-at-home orders now in place in both Arizona and New Mexico, our production facilities are currently operating at full capacity, and we are working tirelessly to ensure that our high-quality BHN products can reach you in a timely manner, free of contamination. We are not currently aware of any disruption in our supply chain, and we have adequate inventory of our products for our customers and their needs.

Our Sales and Customer Service teams are fully trained to serve your needs. Your business is very important to us, and we appreciate your understanding and flexibility during this time. If we can assist you in any way, please contact us and we will do our best to listen and help. Without you, we would no longer have the food, water, and beautiful outdoor areas that we enjoy on a daily basis.

We are confident that, together, we will get through these challenging times and emerge stronger than before.

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